Latest News:

ZILE PAM NAN -

Friday, July 20, 2018

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

British spies were first to spot Trump team’s links with Russia -

Thursday, April 13, 2017

‘N.Y. Times’ probe finds no al-Qaeda link to Benghazi raid

AFP,Getty Images

The report found that the deadly attack was fueled by anger over an anti-Islam U.S.-made video. A lengthy New York Times investigation of the deadly 2012 attack on the U.S diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, found no involvement by al-Qaeda or other international terrorists groups and was accelerated in part by anger at a U.S.-made video denigrating Islam. The attack left four Americans dead, including U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens. The six-part report on the investigation is written by David D. Kirkpatrick and was posted Saturday on the Times‘ website. It centers on extensive interviews with Libyans in Benghazi who, the newspaper says, had direct knowledge of…

China formally eases one-child policy, abolishes labor camps

People walk outside a labour camp in Kunming

People walk outside a labour camp in Kunming, Yunnan province, November 22, 2013. CREDIT: REUTERS/JOHN RUWITCH (Reuters) – China formally approved on Saturday easing its decades-long one-child policy and the abolition of a controversial labor camp system, the official Xinhua news agency reported. Both were among a sweeping raft of reforms announced last month after a meeting of the ruling Communist Party that mapped out policy for the next decade. Under the new policy, couples will be allowed to have two children if one of the parents is an only child. Previously, a couple could generally only have a second child if…

Russia launches new Soyuz rocket

(Reuters) – Russia successfully launched an upgraded version of its Soviet-design Soyuz rocket on Saturday, the Defence Ministry said, giving a boost to the country’s troubled space program. The launch of the Soyuz 2.1v rocket, which features a new engine and digital guidance system, had originally been planned for the beginning of 2012 but was postponed due to an accident during testing which caused engine damage, Interfax reported. It was then scheduled to be launched earlier this week but was delayed again, Interfax reported. The lightweight launch vehicle blasted off Saturday afternoon from Russia’s Plesetsk launch pad in the northwest Arkhangelsk region….

Cuba eases restrictions on loans to small businesses

AP

Nearly 10% of the Cuban workforce are now self-employed The Cuban government has eased restrictions on loans to private borrowers in the latest measure aimed at boosting the island’s troubled economy. Individuals and small businesses can now borrow smaller amounts and have more time to pay back the government. President Raul Castro had launched the programme two years ago as part of measures to reform Cuban socialism. The minimum lending has been reduced from 3,000 to 1,000 pesos ($41; £67). The measure was published in the official gazette. People will also be allowed to use their houses or jewellery to…

Cardiff City vs Sunderland;Cavaliers vs Celtics,Heat vs Blazers; Michigan vs Kansas State+

QCLogo

QuestCinq.com/Sports* 12:00 PM ET Erciyesspor vs Galatasaray 18:00 CET 12:00 PM ET Bahrain vs Iraq 18:00 CET 12:15 PM ET Maccabi Haifa vs MS Ashdod 18:15 CET 12:30 PM ET Cardiff City vs Sunderland 18:30 CET 12:30 PM ET Cardiff City vs Sunderland 18:30 CET 1:00 PM ET Cleveland Cavaliers vs Boston Celtics 19:00 CET 1:00 PM ET Belmont vs Indiana State 19:00 CET 1:00 PM ET Eastern Washington vs Connecticut 19:00 CET 1:00 PM ET N.J.I.T. vs Butler 19:00 CET 1:00 PM ET Maccabi Tel Aviv vs Bnei Yehuda 19:00 CET 1:00 PM ET Chicago Wolves vs Lake Erie…

De nouveaux taxis pour desservir l’aéroport International Toussaint Louverture

Taxi

Une flotte de 100 véhicules tout terrain d’une valeur de deux millions de dollars sera distribuée à 100 chauffeurs membres de l’Association des Chauffeurs Guide d’Haïti et  de l’Association des Chauffeurs Indépendants pour le Développement. L’objectif de ce projet est d’accompagner les chauffeurs de taxis évoluant à l’aéroport International Toussaint Louverture, en les équipant de matériels et en les offrant la formation nécessaire en vue de mieux organiser le transport touristique, a appris HPN. Ce programme, qui est financé par la Banque Nationale de Crédit (BNC) avec un accompagnement de la Banque de la République d’Haïti (BRH), implique la mise…

Des raids de l’armée syrienne font au moins 25 morts à Alep

Reuters, STRINGER

L’offensive aérienne sur l’ancienne capitale économique syrienne s’est poursuivie, samedi 28 décembre. Au moins 25 personnes sont mortes dans les raids de l’armée sur un marché et près d’un hôpital, rapporte l’Observatoire syrien des droits de l’Homme (OSDH). « Les raids ont visé un marché bondé où les gens achètent des légumes et des appareils électroménagers, ce qui explique le grand nombre de morts », a indiqué la Commission générale de la révolution, un réseau de militants. « Le bilan pourrait s’alourdir car il y a des dizaines de blessés », signale l’OSDH. L’ONG fait état de « barils d’explosifs » largués sur le quartier rebelle de Tariq al-Bab dans…

Iraq troops arrest leading Sunni MP in violent raid

A man stands guard near the home of prominent Sunni Muslim lawmaker Ahmed al-Alwani after clashes with Iraqi security forces in the centre of Ramadi

1 OF 3. A man stands guard near the home of prominent Sunni Muslim lawmaker Ahmed al-Alwani after clashes with Iraqi security forces in the centre of Ramadi, December 28, 2013. CREDIT: REUTERS/ALI AL-MASHHADANI  – Iraqi security forces arrested a prominent Sunni Muslim lawmaker and supporter of anti-government protests in a raid on his home in the western province of Anbar, sparking clashes in which at least five people were killed, police sources said. The violent arrest of Ahmed al-Alwani is likely to inflame tensions in Sunni-dominated Anbar, where protesters have been demonstrating against what they see as marginalization of their…

Test Drive: The best cars from 2013

Photo Jaguar

We drive a lot of cars as part of the job, and the most common question is, “What’s your favorite?” Or the similar, “What’s the best thing you’ve driven lately?” Here are some of my picks from the past year’s Test Drive miles. Most fun: Jaguar F-Type V-8. Undiluted joy — right up until you lose your driver’s license. The F-Type’s worth buying (if you can handle a six-figure sticker price) just for the fabulous, outrageous exhaust sound. And it’s not a false promise; the F-Type goes as fast as that growl implies. TEST DRIVE: F-Type’s a howling beauty Even the…

Yahoo! Status Checker by Techya