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Friday, July 20, 2018

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

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Monday, July 9, 2018

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Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

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Thursday, May 10, 2018

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Friday, December 15, 2017

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Friday, December 15, 2017

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Friday, December 15, 2017

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Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

British spies were first to spot Trump team’s links with Russia -

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Muhammadu Buhari takes over Nigeria in crisis

AP

ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — Nigerians celebrated their newly reinforced democracy Friday, dancing, singing praises and releasing white doves as Muhammadu Buhari, the first candidate to beat a sitting president at the polls, became their president.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, accompanied by the commander of U.S. Africa Command, Gen. David M. Rodriguez, was the first foreign official to meet with Nigeria’s new leader after the inauguration. A senior State Department official said Washington is ready to increase military aid and could quickly send more advisers.

To roars of approval at the ceremony, President Buhari pledged to take personal charge of the fight against Boko Haram Islamic extremists and said he will root out human rights violations by the military — abuses that prevented full military cooperation from the U.S. and Britain.

Buhari, a 72-year-old former general who ruled briefly as a military dictator in the 1980s, calls himself a “born-again democrat” and has pledged to fight the endemic corruption that keeps a rich nation impoverished.

“We see him as our only hope against this crippling corruption,” said Efo Okorare, curator of an open-air exhibition of portraits of Nigerian leaders, pointing out the many in military uniforms.

Buhari saluted Nigerians, whether or not they voted for him.

“I belong to everybody and I belong to nobody,” he said to applause. “I intend to serve as president to all Nigerians.”

Nigeria is Africa’s most populous nation with its biggest economy and is the largest oil producer, but government coffers have been hit by massive corruption, a devalued naira currency, low oil prices and a $63 billion debt which grows as Nigeria borrows more to pay government salaries.

Some nervous politicians feared Buhari’s promise to retrieve ill-gotten gains signal a witch hunt. “These fears are groundless,” Buhari said, though he said some of his predecessors had acted “like spoiled children, breaking everything in the house.”

He promised to “ensure that the gross corruption” is checked.

Buhari, resplendent in cream traditional robes, took the oath of office at Eagle Square in Nigeria’s capital. The retired major-general then inspected troops in the plaza, decked out in colors of Nigeria’s green and white flag, and waved to supporters from the back of an open vehicle.

A 21-gun salute boomed during the handover of power which is a turning point in Nigeria’s democratic evolution.

Outside, people danced and sang “Sai baba, sai Buhari,” meaning “Only father, only Buhari.” Some swept the road with reed brooms, signaling Buhari’s promised clean-up.

The newly elected government “is basking in a reservoir of (international) good will and high expectations,” Buhari said, promising to take advantage of it. “Nigeria has a window of opportunity to fulfill our mission as our great nation.”

Kerry tweeted “Congratulations to @MBuhari & the Nigerian people. A privilege to be here to celebrate #Nigeria’s historic & peaceful democratic transition.”

Many African leaders attended the inauguration along with France’s Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius.

Buhari thanked the leaders of neighboring Cameroon, Chad and Niger for contributing to a multinational offensive that this year has driven Boko Haram from towns where it had declared an Islamic caliphate.

Suicide bombings, abductions and hit-and-run attacks in northeast Nigeria continue by what he called “a mindless, godless group.” The insurgency has killed more than 13,000 people and driven more than 1.5 million from their homes.

Buhari said he will not consider the war won without rescuing those held hostage by the extremists, including more than 200 schoolgirls whose mass abduction last year prompted international outrage.

“This government will do all it can to rescue them alive,” Buhari said.

He blamed “official bungling, negligence, complacency or collusion” that allowed Boko Haram to become “a terrifying force.”

Political science professor Richard Joseph of Northwestern University said Buhari’s victory is a sign of hope.

“The world desperately needs a victory against cultist jihadism. Nigeria (under Buhari) can provide it,” he wrote in a blog.

Departing President Goodluck Jonathan last year halted U.S. training of a battalion to fight Boko Haram. No reason was given but his officials had expressed anger at U.S. refusals to sell Nigeria weapons including helicopter gunships.

The United States was hindered by a law preventing certain weapon sales to countries whose militaries are accused of gross human rights violations. Nigeria’s military is accused of killing detainees and civilians and burning their homes in revenge for Boko Haram attacks.

Buhari addressed those concerns Friday, promising to overhaul rules of engagement to prevent abuses and to take “disciplinary steps” against human rights violators.

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