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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

Google to acquire Nest for $3.2 billion in cash

A Google logo is seen at the entrance to the company's offices in Toronto

A Google logo is seen at the entrance to the company’s offices in Toronto September 5, 2013. CREDIT: REUTERS/CHRIS HELGREN – Google Inc took its biggest step to go deeper into consumers’ homes, announcing a $3.2 billion deal to buy smart thermostat and smoke alarm-maker Nest Labs Inc, scooping up a promising line of products and a prized design team led by the “godfather” of the iPod. Nest will continue to operate as its own distinct brand after the all-cash deal closes, Googlesaid on Monday. The deal is the second largest in Google’s history after the $12.5 billion acquisition of mobile phone maker…

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Britain’s Jaguar Land Rover taps global markets for record sales

The Jaguar logo is pictured at a Jaguar Land Rover showroom in Mumbai

The Jaguar logo is pictured at a Jaguar Land Rover showroom in Mumbai February 13, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Vivek Prakash  By Tommy Wilkes   LONDON (Reuters) – British luxury car manufacturer Jaguar Land Rover sold a record volume of vehicles last year, when rising demand in markets such as Brazil, China, India and the United States helped it boost sales by sales by 19 percent. The strong performance highlights the resurgence of the car manufacturing industry in Britain since the 2008 financial crisis, with most of the new cars sold abroad. The company, which is owned by India’s Tata Motors (TAMO.NS),…

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Analysis: Housing experts warn of hiccups as new U.S. mortgage rules go live

A view of single family homes for sale in San Marcos

QuestCinq.com/News – U.S. banksand housing groups are bracing for paperwork headaches and delays as major post-crisis mortgage reforms take effect later this week, but experts say prior warnings of a blow to the housing recovery will not be proven right. On Friday, lenders must be prepared to verify that borrowers can repay their home loans, under rules written by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and required by the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street oversight law. Banks will have to consider a list of factors that show the consumer’s financial health, including income, existing debt obligations and credit history. The reform seeks…

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La moitié des élus au Congrès américain sont millionnaires

AFP

Au moins 268 des 534 élus de la Chambre des représentants et du Sénat ont eu un revenu net d’un million de dollars ou plus en 2012, l’année de référence pour la déclaration de revenus 2013. PHOTO KAREN BLEIER, ARCHIVES AFP Agence France-Presse Washington Pour la première fois de son histoire, la moitié des élus au Congrès des États-Unis sont millionnaires et ils sont autant démocrates que républicains, indique l’analyse d’une association qui travaille sur l’influence de l’argent en politique. Au moins 268 des 534 élus de la Chambre des représentants et du Sénat ont eu un revenu net d’un million…

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Google linking of social network contacts to email raises concerns

An illustration picture shows a Google logo with two one Euro coins

An illustration picture shows a Google logo with two one Euro coins, taken in Munich January 15, 2013. CREDIT: REUTERS/MICHAEL DALDER  – A new feature in Google Inc’s Gmail will result in some users receiving messages from people with whom they have not shared their email addresses, raising concerns among some privacy advocates. The change, which Google announced on Thursday, broadens the list of contacts available to Gmail users so it includes both the email addresses of their existing contacts, as well as the names of people on the Google+ social network. As a result, a person can send an email directly to friends,…

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Insight: Underfunded U.S. homeowner associations get heavy

Ingrid Boak poses in front of her now-rented home in Lexington, Kentucky

Ingrid Boak poses in front of her now-rented home in Lexington, Kentucky December 27, 2013. Credit: Reuters/Tim Webb     – For six years, Ingrid Boak, who travels a lot for work as a racehorse trainer, ignored mail from her homeowner association. Boak, of Lexington, Kentucky, says the letters were requests for $48 in annual fees for upkeep of the tidy neighborhood of one-story brick homes. Because she didn’t use the clubhouse or pool, or participate in social activities sponsored by the association, she didn’t think she needed to pay. Last September, while she was away, a neighbor called to…

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US Senate confirms Janet Yellen to lead Federal Reserve

Janet Yellen will be the first woman to lead the central bank in its 100-year history The US Senate has confirmed Janet Yellen as the next head of the US Federal Reserve. Fifty-six senators voted in favour of Ms Yellen with 26 opposed – many members of the chamber were unable to attend the vote because of bad weather. It was the last procedural hurdle for the 67-year-old before taking over from outgoing chair Ben Bernanke on 1 February. She is the first woman to lead the central bank in its 100-year history. ‘Fierce champion’ President Barack Obama welcomed the…

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Libya navy blocks oil tanker at mutinous eastern port

– Libya’s navy has blocked an oil tanker from illegally loading crude at an eastern port that has been held for months by armed protesters demanding more autonomy from Tripoli, officials said on Monday. “The navy fired warning shots to show that they were serious,” a Libyan National Oil Corp (NOC) official, who declined to be named, told Reuters. Any attempt by protesters to get oil to world markets independently would be a major escalation of their blockade that has slashed Libya’s vital oil exports. “The Libyan navy… dealt on Sunday with a Malta-flagged tanker which tried entering Es-Sider port in cooperation…

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Senate poised to confirm Yellen as Federal Reserve chair

Alex Wong, Getty Images

If confirmed, Yellen will make history by becoming the first woman to head the US central banking system Janet Yellen, President Obama’s nominee to chair the Federal Reserve, at her confirmation hearing on Nov. 14, 2013 on Capitol Hill. Alex Wong/Getty Images The Senate, which begins its 2014 session on Monday, intends to waste no time making history as it moves to approve Janet Yellen to be the first woman to head the Federal Reserve. A vote is set for 5:30 p.m. on Yellen, 67, who has been vice chair of the Fed since 2010. If confirmed, Yellen would succeed…

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Brazil World Cup: Government moves against ‘abusive’ air fares

AFP

Expansion work is underway at Sao Paulo’s biggest airport, Guarulhos Foreign airlines may be allowed to operate internal flights during this year’s football World Cup, the Brazilian president’s chief of staff, Gleisi Hoffmann, says. Ms Hoffman said President Dilma Rousseff was considering issuing a decree to open the internal market in order to prevent abusive price hikes. Brazil expects 600,000 foreign tourists to travel to the country for the event. There are huge disparities between fares charged by different companies. “We have not taken a decision as yet, but if there is abuse that is one of the measures being…

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