Latest News:

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

IMF likely to cut Russia outlook, eyes risks to central, eastern, south-eastern Europe

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) logo is seen at the IMF headquarters building during the 2013 Spring Meeting of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank in Washington

(Reuters) – The International Monetary Fund said on Tuesday that central, eastern and south-eastern Europe faced “an unusual constellation of risks” as the fund prepared to cut its forecasts for Russian growth for the second time in less than a month. In a new report, the IMF said the region was expected to benefit as the euro zone recovers from its debt crisis, but the tension over Ukraine and market concern as the U.S. reduces monetary stimulus were creating high uncertainty. “An unusual constellation of risks clouds the outlook,” the Fund said in its spring Regional Economic Issues report. “Geopolitical tensions surrounding Russia and Ukraine, more challenging…

Read More

Russia PM says certain can minimize sanctions impact

Russia's PM Medvedev speaks as he visits State Duma, lower house of parliament, in Moscow

(Reuters) – Russia, under threat of further sanctions over theUkraine crisis, said on Tuesday it could minimize their impact and would support industries dependent on supplies from abroad. Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev told parliament sanctions were a chance for Russia to reduce its dependence on imports and that its economic priorities were unchanged. “We shan’t give up on cooperation with foreign companies, including from Western countries, but we will be ready for unfriendly steps,” he said in a report to lawmakers on the government’s work in 2013. “I am sure we can minimize their impact,” he said. “We will not allow our citizens to…

Read More

Russia mulls lawsuit against U.S. in WTO over sanctions

Russian President Putin speaks with newly appointed Economy Minister Ulyukayev during their meeting in Novo-Ogaryovo

(Reuters) – Russia is looking at the possibility of filing a lawsuit against the United States in the World Trade Organisation over sanctions hitting Russian banks, Economy Minister Alexei Ulyukayev said on Wednesday, according to Russian news agencies. St Petersburg-based Bank Rossiya was sanctioned alongside its chairman and largest shareholder Yuri Kovalchuk in March as part of punitive measures by Washington over Russia’s annexation of Crimea. Russian bank SMP was also indirectly affected as co-owners Boris Rotenberg and his older brother Arkady fell under U.S. sanctions. SMP chief executive Dmitry Kalantyrsky has said that an estimated 9 billion rubles ($249 million) had been withdrawn after…

Read More

Fritz Robert Saint Paul, nouveau président de la Cour des comptes

Haitian Money

QuestCinq.com Deux jours après leur entrée en fonction les conseillers de la Cour Supérieur des Comptes et du Contentieux Administratif (CSCCA) ont élu Fritz Robert Saint Paul président du tribunal administratif d’Haïti. Candidat unique à la présidence, l’ancien président de la chambre des députés a obtenu 6 votes favorables lors du scrutin. L’élection de M. Saint Paul met un terme aux allégations sur une éventuelle entente entre les acteurs politiques pour le maintien de Mme Nonie Mathieu en poste jusqu’à la fin de l’année fiscale. Mme Mathieu, qui était restée en poste au delà de son mandat sur requête du…

Read More

Putin and government to discuss Ukraine energy ties

(Reuters) – President Vladimir Putin will meet senior Russian government officials on Wednesday to discuss Russia’s economic ties with Ukraine, including on energy, his spokesman said. The spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, gave no further details. State-controlled natural gasproducer Gazprom says Ukraine missed a deadline to pay its March gas bill by midnight on Monday and owes the Russian company $2.2 billion. “A meeting is planned with the leaders of the government to discuss the extraordinary situation that has developed in economic cooperation with Ukraine, including in … energy dialogue,” Peskov said. Gazprom has nearly doubled the price it charges Ukraine for gas, to $485 per…

Read More

Les restaurants McDonald’s quittent la Crimée

CLÉMENT ZAMPA Agence France-Presse Simferopol, Crimée Une petite fille blonde tire désespérément la porte, pendant que sa mère lit un écriteau à haute voix : «Pour des raisons de fabrication, le restaurant est fermé». La population de Simferopol, en Crimée, a découvert vendredi avec stupéfaction la brusque fermeture de son McDonald’s. L’établissement de la capitale de la Crimée, rattachée à la Russie après un référendum le 16 mars, scrutin que Kiev et les Occidentaux ne reconnaissent pas, parlant d’«annexion», est l’un des trois de la péninsule, avec ceux de Sébastopol et Yalta. Tous sont désormais fermés. Le géant américain de la…

Read More

Noble beginnings: The first jobs of Nobel Prize winners

Photos of the 2013 Nobel Prize laureates in Economic Sciences Fama, Hansen and Shiller are displayed during a news conference in Stockholm

BY CHRIS TAYLOR (Reuters) – We all start somewhere. Reuters has proven this edict since last August, when we started asking some of America’s greatest achievers about the first jobs they had. We have talked to chief executives of billion-dollar companies, beloved authors, TV personalities and tech gurus. But then we figured: Let’s talk to an even more elite club. And you can’t get much more exclusive than those who have reached the absolute pinnacle of human achievement: the Nobel Prize. Here, in conjunction with the release of the nation’s monthly jobs report, some American Nobel winners recount their very first…

Read More

Russia raises gas prices for Ukraine by 80 percent

(Reuters) – Russia raised the gas price for Ukraine on Thursday for the second time this week, almost doubling it in three days and piling pressure on a neighbor on the brink of bankruptcy in the crisis over Crimea. The increase, announced in Moscow by Russian natural gas producer Gazprom, meansUkraine will pay 80 percent more for its gas than before the initial increase on Monday. Prime Minister Arseny Yatseniuk said the latest move, two weeks after Moscow annexed Ukraine’s Crimea region, was unacceptable and warned that he expected Russia to increase pressure on Kiev by limiting supply to his country. “There is no reason why Russia would raise the gas…

Read More

JP Morgan to process payment for Russian embassy, easing tension

(Reuters) – JP Morgan Chase & Co is processing a payment from Russia’s embassy in Kazakhstan to insurance agency Sogaz, easing tension after Moscow accused the U.S. bank of illegally blocking the transaction under the pretext of sanctions. Russia’s Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday the “unacceptable, illegal and absurd” act of blocking the payment would have consequences for the U.S. Embassy in Russia. The confrontation threatened to further strain ties between Washington and Moscow, locked in the worst standoff since the Cold War over Russia’s annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea region. “Following consultation with our regulators, we are processing this transaction,” JPMorgan…

Read More

Iran, Russia working to seal $20 billion oil-for-goods deal: sources

BY JONATHAN SAUL AND PARISA HAFEZI – Iran and Russia have made progress toward an oil-for-goods deal that sources said could be worth up to $20 billion and enable Tehran to boost vital energy exports in defiance of Western sanctions, people familiar with the negotiations told Reuters. In January, Reuters reported that Moscow and Tehran were discussing a barter deal that would see Moscow buy up to 500,000 barrels a day of Iranian oil in exchange for Russian equipment and goods. The United States has said such a deal would raise “serious concerns” and be inconsistent with the nuclear talks between world powers and Iran. A Russian source…

Read More

Yahoo! Status Checker by Techya