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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

Pour la première fois en près de 50 ans, le Japon exportera des armes

EUGENE HOSHIKO, AP

JACQUES LHUILLERY Agence France-Presse Tokyo-Le Japon a levé mardi l’interdiction de vendre des armes à l’étranger qu’il s’est imposé pendant près d’un demi-siècle, en pleine tension régionale notamment avec son voisin chinois. Le gouvernement de droite de Shinzo Abe a approuvé une nouvelle doctrine en la matière qui remplace cet interdit datant de 1967, a annoncé le secrétaire général du gouvernement Yoshihide Suga. Désormais le Japon pourra par exemple exporter du matériel militaire – il préfère parler de matériel de défense, un terme moins martial – à des pays qui se situent le long de voies maritimes par lesquelles transitent…

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Russia tightens squeeze on Ukraine with gas price rise

(Reuters) – Russian natural gas producer Gazprom announced a more than 40 percent increase in the price of gas for Ukraine on Tuesday, stepping up economic pressure on Kiev in its crisis in relations with Moscow. Price rows have in the past led to cuts in Russian gas supplies to Ukraine and decreases in onward deliveries to Europe, but this time the financial blow to Kiev is set to be cushioned by a new International Monetary Fund loan package. Ukraine will now have to pay $385.5 per 1,000 cubic meters of gas in the second quarter, an increase from the $268.5 agreed in December and higher than the…

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Russian prime minister flaunts grip on Crimea with visit

Medvedev chairs a government meeting in the Crimean city of Simferopol

(Reuters) – Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev flaunted Russia’s grip on Crimea on Monday by flying to the region and announcing plans to turn it into a special economic zone, defying Western demands to hand the region back to Ukraine. The visit, hours after Russia held talks on Ukraine with the United States, is likely to anger Kiev and the West, which accuse president Vladimir Putin of illegally seizing the Black Sea peninsula after a March 16 referendum they say was a sham. Shortly after landing in Crimea’s main city of Simferopol with many members of his cabinet, Medvedev chaired a Russian government meeting attended by…

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Dépréciation accelérée de la gourde…

Haitian Money

Le président de l’association des économistes haïtiens,  Eddy Labossière,  a déploré jeudi la dépréciation accélérée de la gourde par rapport au dollar US. Il faut aujourd’hui 45 gourdes pour se procurer un dollar. Le docteur en économie explique que l’appareil productif haïtien n’est pas performant pour produire des biens et services  et ainsi  permettre de limiter les importations. Le modèle mis en place ne peut   produire des biens et services même pour la consommation intérieure, a-t-il dénoncé,  soulignant le pays  dispose d’une économie  presque totalement dépendante  des autres économies pour la consomation intérieure. Haïti importe aujourd’hui  jusqu’à  la papaye,  le…

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Putin tells West Russia will develop own card payment system

(Reuters) – President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday that Russia would develop its own credit card system to reduce reliance on Western-based companies and soften the potential blow from U.S. and EU sanctions. Putin voiced his support for plans described by senior officials to create a domestic-based system in response to restrictions placed on Russian banks last week by Visa and MasterCard, which are widely use by Russians. “We certainly must do this, and we will do it,” Putin told senior Russian lawmakers during a meeting that mainly focused on efforts to integrate the Crimea region after he signed legislation to make…

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IMF throws Ukraine financial lifeline, Russian economy to slump

A Russian soldier guides a Ukrainian tank in northern Crimea

(Reuters) – Ukraine won a $27-billion international financial lifeline on Thursday, rushed through in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, as Moscow’s economy minister spoke of the cost of military action in its former Soviet neighbor. The International Monetary Fund announced agreement on a $14-18 billion standby credit for Kiev in return for tough economic reforms that will unlock further aid from the European Union, the United States and other lenders over two years. The IMF deal, to be approved by the global agency’s board next month, was a political boost for the pro-Western government that replaced ousted Russian-backed President Viktor Yanukovich last…

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U.S., EU to work together on tougher Russia sanctions

People fish on a pier at the port of Mariupol

(Reuters) – The United States and the European Union agreed on Wednesday to work together to prepare possible tougher economic sanctions in response to Russia’s behavior in Ukraine, including on the energy sector, and to make Europe less dependent on Russian gas. U.S. President Barack Obama said after a summit with top EU officials that Russian President Vladimir Putin had miscalculated if he thought he could divide the West or count on its indifference over his annexation of Crimea. Leaders of the Group of Seven major industrial powers decided this week to hold off on sanctions targeting Moscow’s economy unless…

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Limes bite back, as prices rise 2,400%

Lime

Palm Beach Post Web Staff Mojitos, margaritas, key lime pie, ceviche… even the lime wedge on your Corona, all are at risk. Is the lime-pocalypse far behind? About 98% of limes consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico. But our neighbors to the south are feeling seriously squeezed by a shortage, according to NPR. Mexican growers blame too much rain, and a bacteria for the poor crop. There, limes are selling for 50 pesos a kilo — about $1.75 a pound, or three times the normal price. U.S. stores are charging an average of 53 cents for one lime, compared with…

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U.S. surprises with 5 million barrel from crude oil reserve sale

Barricades protect the entrance to the U.S. Department of Energy's Stategic Petroleum Reserve in Bryan Mound

(Reuters) – The U.S. Department of Energy will sell up to 5 million barrels of crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a move it said was to test the capabilities of the nation’s emergency stockpile in a rapidly changing oil market. In the first sale from the reserve since 1990 that is specifically designed as a test, the department will offer sour crude from its West Hackberry and Big Hill sites on the U.S. Gulf coast, with bids due March 14. Surging U.S. shale oil production has changed the logistics of U.S. crude markets. Instead of moving oil from the Gulf…

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Russia pushes on with gas pipeline despite EU delaying talks

(Reuters) – Russia’s Gazprom, disregarding European Commission plans to delay talks, said it expected to sign deals this month on building its major South Stream pipeline to carry gas to central and southern Europe without crossing Ukraine. It made the announcement a day after the Commission said it would postpone talks with Gazprom over South Stream which still requires European Union legislation, including exemptions from rules that limit pipeline ownership and require access be provided to other gas firms. The bloc, already concerned to reduce the Russian state-controlled company’s dominance over its energy supply, especially in eastern Europe, has been further…

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