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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

Job report:US economy adds 175,000 jobs in February

Getty Images

QuestCinq.com –The US economy added 175,000 new jobs in February, but the unemployment rate rose slightly to 6.7%. The jobs figures, from the US Labor Department were better than many had been expecting, and marked a rebound from two weak months. It had been thought the figures would be affected by recent harsh weather, which had hit much of the country. But the unemployment rate, calculated in a different survey, went up slightly from January’s 6.6% to 6.7%. Source:Agencies

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Russia warns could ‘reduce to zero’ economic dependency on US

Russia

Moscow (AFP) – Russia could reduce to zero its economic dependency on the United States if Washington agreed sanctions against Moscow over Ukraine, a Kremlin aide said on Tuesday, warning that the American financial system faced a “crash” if this happened. “We would find a way not just to reduce our dependency on the United States to zero but to emerge from those sanctions with great benefits for ourselves,” said Kremlin economic aide Sergei Glazyev. He told the RIA Novosti news agency Russia could stop using dollars for international transactions and create its own payment system using its “wonderful trade…

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Miami police chief lays down law to cops: Get unruly again and you will be arrested

A day after dozens of Miami police union members stormed City Hall and interrupted a commission meeting, Police Chief Manuel Orosa laid down the law: Do it again and you’ll be prosecuted. An investigation has been promised. Last Thursday, while commissioners were conducting city business, a peaceful rally in Peacock Park just down the street turned into a road trip, with unionized officers marching into nearby City Hall and demanding that the city restore benefits taken away over the years to help balance the budget. They held up signs that read “Low pay, low morale.” They banged against glass windows….

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Le gaz russe, enjeu crucial pour l’Ukraine et l’Union européenne

AFP, GENIA SAVILOV

C’est un savant calcul diplomatique auquel se livre, depuis plusieurs semaines, l’Union européenne (UE), dans sa gestion du conflit opposant l’Ukraine à laRussie. Si certains, en Europe, brandissent des menaces de sanctions ciblées à l’intention de Moscou, le pas n’a pas été franchi. Car la Russie possède une arme de taille : son gaz. Et s’il est l’un des enjeux majeurs de la crise entre la Russie et l’Ukraine, il concerne également de près l’Union européenne. Un quart du gaz consommé au sein de l’UE provient en effet de Russie, et 60 % de ce dernier transite aujourd’hui par l’Ukraine. Il s’agit là d’un…

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Bill Gates regains top spot as world’s richest person

AFP

QuestCinq.com/News Microsoft founder Bill Gates has regained the top spot as the world’s richest person, according to Forbes magazine’s annual ranking of global billionaires. Mr Gates’ total net worth was estimated at $76bn (£45.5bn) this year, up from $67bn in 2013. His rise in wealth knocked Mexican telecoms tycoon Carlos Slim off the top spot into second place. In total, there were a record 1,645 billionaires, according to Forbes. The funds needed to make it into the top 20 ranking are now $31bn, up from $23bn last year, Forbes said. Mr Gates has been top of the list for 15…

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L’Ukraine au bord de la faillite

An anti-government demonstrator walks past a currency exchange office in Kiev

Les réserves de change fondent, la devise chute. L’Ukraine en pleine crise politique pourra-t-elle honorer ses prochains remboursements de dette? La menace d’un défaut de paiement est brandie. Alors que dans les rues de Kiev le bilan des affrontements s’alourdit, L’Etat ukrainien est-il au bord de la faillite? Le ministre américain des Finances, Jack Lew, a tiré le signal d’alarme, mercredi, en enjoignant l’Ukraine de s’adresser au FMI (Fonds monétaire international), pour mettre «en place des réformes» et recevoir «le soutien dont ils ont besoin en échange». Pour l’heure, le sort financier de l’ex-république soviétique est plus que jamais entre…

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L’initiative du Mpdp se positionne contre le projet touristique gouvernemental à l’Ile-à-Vache

Credit Google, HPN

— L’initiative du Mouvement patriotique démocratique et populaire (Mpdp) prend position contre le projet gouvernemental « Ile-à-vache destination touristique » qui suscite depuis plusieurs mois des remous sur l’ile située au sud du pays. Aéroport, routes, hôtels et résidences privées, terrains de golf, sont entre autres les travaux d’infrastructures prévus dans le cadre du projet pour un montant estimé à 260 millions de dollars. Seulement les habitants et habitantes de l’Ile-à-vache se disent inquiets de devoir céder leurs terres à l’Etat en contrepartie. La plupart vivent de la pêche, de l’élevage et de l’agriculture. Ces inquiétudes n’ont pas cessé d’augmenter alors qu’une…

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Facebook to buy messaging app WhatsApp for $16bn

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Facebook has bought messaging app WhatsApp for $16bn (£9.6bn), with an additional $3bn given to WhatsApp’s founders and employees. It is the social networking giant’s biggest acquisition to date. WhatsApp has over 450 million monthly users and is popular with people looking to avoid text messaging charges. In a statement, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg described WhatsApp’s services as “incredibly valuable”. WhatsApp allows users to send messages over internet connections, avoiding text messaging fees. The company claims it is currently registering one million new users a day. WhatsApp founder Jan Koum will stay on and operate the firm independently. He will…

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WHAT? Pizza Hut Worker Fired After Urinating In Sink

QuestCinq.com KERMIT, W.Va. (AP) — Health officials have temporarily shut down a southern West Virginia pizza restaurant after a district manager was caught on surveillance video urinating into a sink. Local media reported that the Mingo County health department ordered the Pizza Hut in Kermit, about 85 miles southwest of Charleston, to shut down. Pizza Hut Corp. released a statement saying it was “embarrassed” by the manager’s actions. The company says it has “zero tolerance” for violations of its operating standards. The employee was fired. His name was not released. The video shows the manager urinating in a sink in…

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Consumers wary of Comcast, Time Warner Cable merger

Gene J. Puskar, AP

Lack of competition could lead to higher rates and fewer choices, consumer advocates warn. Consumer advocates, industry analysts and cable customers wasted little time Thursday in airing concerns about the blockbuster deal to combine Comcast and Time Warner Cable, the nation’s two largest cable companies. The $45 billion deal, if approved by federal regulators, would result in a total customer base of 30 million subscribers and could bring technological advances to the world of cable TV and high-speed internet. MORE: How the Comcast-Time Warner deal came together But the proposed merger comes at a time when customer satisfaction with the cable…

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