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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

Why Your Thong May Be Bad For Your Health

Miranda Kerr flashes her thong after putting baby Flynn in her waiting SUV in NYC

QuestCinq.com They work wonders for panty lines, but sometimes we get the feeling that our thongs are bad for us. Sometimes they’re too tight, sometimes they rub the wrong way and sometimes they just don’t feel all that clean. But is the skimpy underwear really bad for our health? We called up Dr. Jill M. Rabin, an Associate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology and Women’s Health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Dr. Shieva Ghofrany, an OB/GYN with Stamford Hospital, in Conn., to get the lowdown on those garments we wear low down. What are our undies really…

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CNN names retired Palm Beach County teacher a ‘hero’, gives her $50k and shot at $250K

Pyfrom

QuestCinq.com Retired Palm Beach County school teacher Estella Pyfrom reached deep into her own pockets to bring a literal busload of technology to children who didn’t have it at home. Now CNN is giving her $50,000 in recognition of her work and a chance to collect $250,000 more to expand on it. Pyfrom was named one of 10 CNN Heroes, billed as “Everyday People Changing the World.” The competition is considerable. But, maybe in Pyfrom’s favor, it will be the click of the mouse that determines the winner. Pyfrom, after all, is connecting children from elementary to high school to…

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‘How Much Will Obamacare Cost Me?’ Try Our Calculator

NPR

QuestCinq.com/Obamacare/YOUR PRICE –On Tuesday, if all goes according to plan, the federal health law’s marketplaces for individual health insurance are scheduled to open for business. Nearly all Americans will be required to have health insurance starting Jan. 1, 2014, or else they’ll be liable for a tax penalty. Even now, there is quite a bit of confusion about the law and how it will work. The administration has even enlisted former President Bill Clinton to serve as the law’s explainer in chief. On the eve of the marketplaces’ planned opening, many people aren’t sure if they’ll qualify for subsidized insurance….

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Examens d’Etat : publication des résultats de la session extraordinaire du bac pour 9 départements

QuestCinq/Education   Le ministère de l’Education nationale et de la Formation professionnelle a l’avantage d’informer le public en général et les candidats concernés en particulier que les résultats de la session extraordinaire du bac (1 ère et 2 ème parties) sont disponibles pour neuf départements scolaires à l’exception de l’Ouest. Suivant les chiffres fournis par le Bureau national des examens d’Etat, Le Nord’Est arrive en première position avec 50,36 % de réussite en rhéto et 43,17 % en philo, suivi du Sud en deuxième position avec 45,32 % de réussite en rhéto et 59, 08 % en philo. Le Centre…

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Vaccine ‘clears HIV-like virus’ in monkeys

HIV

–A vaccine for the monkey equivalent of HIV appears to eradicate the virus, a study suggests. Research published in the journal Nature has shown that vaccinated monkeys can clear Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) infection from their bodies. It was effective in nine of the 16 monkeys that were inoculated. The US scientists say they now want to use a similar approach to test a vaccine for HIV in humans. Prof Louis Picker, from the Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute at Oregon Health and Science University, said: “It’s always tough to claim eradication – there could always be a cell which…

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Court blocks judge from resentencing teacher convicted of raping student

Credit AP

QuestCinq.com/News Montana’s Supreme Court on Friday blocked a judge’s attempt to resentence a former teacher who had received 30 days in prison for his months-long relationship with a 14-year-old student, who later took her own life. Justices said Judge G. Todd Baugh lacks authority to reconsider the sentence he gave former Billings, Mont. teacher Stacey Rambold, 54. An appeal of the case was already pending, but Baugh had been seeking to undo a sentence that was widely criticized when he remarked that victim Cherice Moralez was “older than her chronological age.” An online petition calling for Baugh’s resignation, after he…

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An Ala. state lawmaker wants Toni Morrison’s first book banned; calls it ‘objectionable.’

USAToday

QuestCinq.com/News An Alabama state senator is pushing to ban the first novel of Nobel and Pulitzer winner Toni Morrison on the grounds that its content and language are “objectionable.” State Sen. Bill Holtzclaw, a Republican, wants The Bluest Eye pulled from high school reading lists, and says he also would support pulling it from high school libraries, according to the Alabama Media Group. “The book is just completely objectionable, from language to the content,” Holtzclaw said of the book, which includes mention of incest and child molestation. The novel is based in Lorain, Ohio, Morrison’s hometown, and details the story of Pecola Breedlove,…

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Examens d’Etat : publication des résultats complets des examens du bac (1ère et 2ème parties)

Haiti

Communiqué de presse   Les résultats des examens du baccalauréat 1ère et 2ème parties sont désormais disponibles pour tous les départements scolaires depuis le 24 août 2013. Suivant les chiffres fournis par le Bureau national des examens d’Etat (BUNEXE), le taux de réussite global est de 28,63 % pour la rhéto et de 63, 04 % pour la philo. Pour le bac 1ère partie, le meilleur taux de réussite vient du Centre avec 31,98 %, suivi de l’Ouest en deuxième position avec 30,17 %, et du Nord-est en troisième position avec 29,41 %. Le plus faible taux vient du Nord-Ouest avec 21,29…

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With tuition rising slightly, Gov. Rick Scott asks board to be tough on fees

By Tia Mitchell Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau TAMPA — Despite Gov. Rick Scott’s pleas, tuition is going up slightly at all but two of Florida’s universities. So Scott is returning to the board that oversees state universities with a new request: Be tough on fee increases. Scott on Wednesday asked the Florida Board of Governors to carefully consider fee hikes for students next year. The board will decide what to do Thursday as it wraps up three days of meetings at the University of South Florida. In a letter, Scott stopped just short of asking board members to reject increased fees,…

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Margaret Doughty, Atheist Seeking U.S. Citizenship, Told To Join Church Or Be Denied

Doughty

QuestCinq.com/news Margaret Doughty, an atheist and permanent U.S. resident for more than 30 years, was told by immigration authorities this month that she has until Friday to officially join a church that forbids violence or her application for naturalized citizenship will be rejected. Doughty received the ultimatum after stating on her application that she objected to the pledge to bear arms in defense of the nation due to her moral opposition to war. According to a letter to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services by the American Humanist Association on Doughty’s behalf, officials responded by telling her that she needed to…

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