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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.”

Joe Rondone, Tallahassee

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration…

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Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution

BBC

US President Donald Trump has defended US efforts to reportedly undermine a World Health Organization (WHO) measure in support of breastfeeding. A New York Times report claimed US officials fought against language that all governments should “protect, promote and support breastfeeding”. The report alleges that the US threatened countries over the resolution, which eventually passed. A government spokesperson called the reports “patently false” on Monday. On Twitter, Mr Trump “called out” the Times and said the “US strongly supports breastfeeding”. Image Copyright @realDonaldTrump@REALDONALDTRUMP Report According to the Times report on Sunday based on interviews with dozens of meeting participants, US negotiations…

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Mwen se moun nan Panyòl

QuestCinq

QuestCinq.com* QC notes: Fondateur de l’Institution CITAD Multimédia, M. Alouidor a étudié le journalisme (à l’Institut Français d’Haïti), la littérature (DHEF à Paris), la Psychologie (Faculté d’Ethnologie) et l’Agro-Economie (FAMV).   Il est l’un des premiers à éditer un magazine consacré aux arts et spectacles. Il a aussi animé une rubrique technologique, «La page de Micro Mag » dans les colonnes du quotidien Le Nouvelliste (1998-1999) et a fait partie de l’équipe de rédaction de « Spectacles et Variétés » et de Ticket Magazine. Pa Daniel Alouidor Mwen se moun nan Panyòl Nan Panyòl se la m gen zo grann…

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ZILE PAM NAN

Daniel A. & QC

 QuestCinq.com/Pwezi* QC notes:Fondateur de l’Institution CITAD Multimédia, M. Alouidor a étudié le journalisme (à l’Institut Français d’Haïti), la littérature (DHEF à Paris), la Psychologie (Faculté d’Ethnologie) et l’Agro-Economie (FAMV)… Li  Mwen se moun nan Panyòl! Pa Daniel Alouidor ZILE PAM NAN Zile pam nan, se yon dyaman tou nèf ankenn graj sou latè pa janmen grafouyen   Zile pam nan, se yon rèv paradi, boul lò anfouraye nan mitan dlo lanmè   Zile pam nan, se lejann san parèy ki travèse lespas, vire lòlòj listwa   Zile pam nan, se la bon van fè nich, sèl kote dlo pandye bò…

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Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead

BBC

More than 100 people have died after a Boeing 737 airliner crashed near Jose Marti International Airport in Havana, Cuban state media say. Three people have survived but are in a critical condition, Cuban Communist Party newspaper Granma reported. The plane was carrying 110 passengers and crew, according to the Mexican firm from which the plane was leased. Two days of national mourning have been declared, after Cuba’s worst air disaster since the 1980s. The Boeing 737-201 crashed at 12;08 (16:08 GMT) on Friday, shortly after taking off from Havana on an internal flight to Holguin in the east of…

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Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections

Reuters

An alliance headed by the former Shia militia chief Moqtada Sadr has won the parliamentary elections in Iraq. Final results released by the electoral commission give his Saeroun bloc 54 seats, with current Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi in third place with 42. Mr Sadr, a long-term adversary of the United States, cannot become prime minister himself as he did not stand as a candidate. But he is expected to play a major role in forming the new government. Mr Sadr has reinvented himself as an anti-corruption champion after making his name as a militia chief fighting US forces after the…

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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’

Sacco Caller Times

Hours after the most recent mass killing in Texas, Gov. Greg Abbott went to the city where it happened just outside of Houston and said that unity and faith might not be enough to curb the shootings in his state. The Republican governor, a strong supporter of the Second Amendment, inched toward exploring a new approach to gun safety. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas and a politician with an A+ rating from the National Rifle Association, stood beside him. “We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families,” Abbott said. “It’s time in Texas that we take action to step…

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Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore

PHOTO Ahn Young joon AP

WASHINGTON — President Trump announced Thursday that he will meet North Korea’s June 12 in Singapore. The announcement capped weeks of negotiations that began when Trump announced March 8 he had accepted Kim’s invitation as delivered by South Korea government officials. While teasing the announcement in recent days, Trump has said he would continue urging China and other nations to cut off economic aid to North Korea until it agrees to give up its nuclear weapons programs. “A lot of things can happen,” Trump said Wednesday. “A lot of good things can happen. A lot of bad things can happen. I…

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Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’

Trump

US President Donald Trump supports the FBI “100%”, he told law enforcement leaders during a graduation ceremony at the agency’s Virginia headquarters. His visit comes only days after he referred to the agency as “in tatters” and “the worst in history”. During his remarks, Mr Trump heaped praise on the FBI, which critics say has grown more politicised since the 2016 election. Earlier he vowed to “rebuild the FBI… bigger and better than ever”. “The president of the United States has your back 100 percent,” he said on Friday at the FBI’s National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. “By the way,…

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Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report

Muller

Special counsel Robert Mueller‘s office has reportedly requested information from Cambridge Analytica, the data firm utilized by the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential race. The Wall Street Journal reports that Mueller’s team has requested all emails from employees at the firm who worked with the campaign. The request, which wasn’t previously known, was voluntary, as was another request the firm complied with from the House Intelligence Committee, the newspaper reported. Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix also interviewed with the House Intelligence Committee over video call this week, according to the report. Nix was reported earlier this year to have been in contact with top…

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