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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

Poll: Senate races tight in three swing states

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Senate races in three battleground states — Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania — are nearly deadlocked, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday. In Ohio, incumbent Sen. Rob Portman (R) has 42 percent support, trailing Democratic opponent Ted Strickland, who has 43 percent. The poll sampled 1,042 Ohio voters and has a margin of error of 3 points. In Pennsylvania, Sen. Pat Toomey (R) has a 1-point edge over Democrat Katie McGinty, 45 percent to 44 percent. The poll sampled 1,077 Pennsylvania voters and has a margin of error of three points. In Florida, Rep. Patrick Murphy (D) leads all…

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Hagel says NATO deployment could spark a new Cold War with Russia

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By Kristina Wong – 05/11/16 02:29 AM EDT Former Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Tuesday urged caution in response to NATO’s plans to deploy four battalions to the Baltic states, warning it could lead to another Cold War with Russia. “If I were secretary of defense today, I’d be careful with this because, I’m not opposed to it, but we can find ourselves very quickly in another Cold War buildup here, that really makes no sense for either side,” he said at a media roundtable at the Atlantic Council. In response to NATO’s decision to send the four battalions —…

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Obama to visit Hiroshima, won’t apologize for World War II bombing

Doves fly over the Peace Memorial Park with the Atomic Bomb Dome in the background, at a ceremony in Hiroshima, western Japan, August 6, 2015, on the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city. REUTERS/Toru Hanai

Doves fly over the Peace Memorial Park with the Atomic Bomb Dome in the background, at a ceremony in Hiroshima, western Japan, August 6, 2015, on the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city. REUTERS/TORU HANAI Barack Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima in Japan later this month, but he will not apologize for the United States’ dropping of an atomic bomb on the city in World War Two, the White House said on Tuesday. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize early in his presidency in 2009 in part for his commitment to nuclear nonproliferation,…

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Turkish court says insufficient evidence against suspected killer of Russian pilot

A war plane crashes in flames in a mountainous area in northern Syria after it was shot down by Turkish fighter jets near the Turkish-Syrian border November 24, 2015. Turkish fighter jets shot down a Russian-made warplane near the Syrian border on Tuesday after repeatedly warning it over air space violations, Turkish officials said, but Moscow said it could prove the jet had not left Syrian air space. Turkish presidential sources said the warplane was a Russian-made SU-24. Turkey's military, which did not confirm the plane's origin, said it had been warned 10 times in the space of five minutes about violating Turkish airspace. Russia's defence ministry said one of its fighter jets had been downed in Syria, apparently after coming under fire from the ground, but said it could prove the plane was over Syria for the duration of its flight, Interfax news agency reported. REUTERS/Sadettin Molla ATTENTION EDITORS - FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE      TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX1VKC4

A Turkish court has decided there is insufficient evidence to prosecute a man suspected of killing a Russian air force pilot after his plane was shot down by a Turkish jet near the Syrian-Turkish border last November, the man’s lawyer said on Tuesday. Russian defense officials said at the time that the pilot had managed to eject from his Su-24 plane only to be killed by ground fire from militants inside Syria. His navigator survived but a Russian marine was killed during the rescue mission. Alparslan Celik, who was fighting with a Turkish-backed Turkmen brigade opposing government forces in northern…

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Brazilian president’s impeachment process back on track as speaker backtracks

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff reacts during a launch ceremony of Agricultural and Livestock Plan for 2016/2017, at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil May 4, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff’s looming suspension from office was back on track on Tuesday after the speaker of the lower house of Congress withdrew his controversial decision to annul an impeachment vote against her. The Senate will vote on Wednesday whether to put Rousseff on trial for breaking budget laws. If, as is widely expected, a simple majority agrees to hold the trial, she will be automatically suspended from office for up to six months. Vice President Michel Temer would take over as president, and if Rousseff were convicted and removed definitively, he would stay in the post until elections…

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Mexican judge rules El Chapo can be extradited to the US to stand trial

El Chapo

El Chapo was shipped to a penitentiary in Ciudad Juárez on Saturday as part of a regular rotation of prisoners, according to Mexican officials. Photograph: Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images A Mexican federal judge has ruled that Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán can be extradited to face trial in the US, days after he was moved to a prison on the border with Texas. Mexico’s foreign ministry now has 20 days to approve the extradition, a political decision which Guzmán’s lawyers described as a foregone conclusion. “We’re convinced the (foreign ministry) will concede this request for extradition,” José Refugio Rodriguez, one of the…

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Rousseff impeachment vote annulled, throwing Brazil legislature into chaos

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff attends a signing ceremony for new universities, at Planalto Palace in Brasilia, Brazil, May 9, 2016. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino

Brazil’s political landscape has been thrown deeper into chaos after the interim speaker of the country’s lower house announced the annulment of last month’s impeachment vote against Dilma Rousseff. The surprise move – which was immediately challenged by senior figures in the senate – provides a new twist in the country’s ongoing political drama that would stretch the credibility of a House of Cards plot. Waldir Maranhão, who took over as acting speaker last week, said a new congressional vote would be needed as a result of procedural flaws in the earlier session on 17 April that dealt Rousseff a…

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Ryan: I’ll step down as convention chairman if Trump asks

The Hill

Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) says he’s willing to relinquish his duties as chairman of the Republican National Convention in July if Donald Trump requests it. “He’s the nominee. I’ll do whatever he wants with respect to the convention,” Ryan said during an interview with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on Monday. The willingness to hand over the convention position comes ahead of Ryan’s Capitol Hill meeting this Thursday with Trump and Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus. Ryan last week said that he’s not ready to support Trump, a break from other top GOP leaders like Priebus and Senate Majority Leader…

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Election analyst flips 11 states toward Democrats due to Trump

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The nonpartisan Cook Political Report has shifted 11 states on its election scorecard toward Democrats since Donald Trump became the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. “This has been an exceedingly unpredictable year,” the analyst said. “Although we remain convinced that Hillary Clinton is very vulnerable and would probably lose to most other Republicans, Donald Trump’s historic unpopularity with wide swaths of the electorate — women, millennials, independents and Latinos — make him the initial November underdog.” Colorado, Florida, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin were all shifted from toss-up states to leaning Democratic. The “solid Republican” states Missouri and Indiana were downgraded to…

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Russian orchestra, Putin’s friends, play Syria’s Palmyra

Russia's Mariinsky Theater performs at the amphitheater of the Syrian city of Palmyra, Syria in this handout picture provided by SANA on May 5, 2016. SANA/Handout via REUTERS

Russia’s Mariinsky Theatre staged a surprise concert in the amphitheatre of the Syrian city of Palmyra on Thursday, in what looked like an attempt by the Kremlin to win hearts and minds and remind the world of its role in the city’s recapture. The concert, held just over a month after Russian air strikes helped push Islamic State militants out of Palmyra, saw Valery Gergiev, a close associate of President Vladimir Putin, conduct the Mariinsky orchestra. Sergei Roldugin, a cellist friend of Putin’s named in the Panama Paper leaks as owning a network of offshore firms that have handled billions…

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