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Friday, July 20, 2018

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

British spies were first to spot Trump team’s links with Russia -

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’

The guardian

Former Attorney General Eric Holder on Thursday warned Congressional Republicans not to make any moves to remove special counsel Robert Mueller, saying such an attempt “will not be tolerated.” “Speaking on behalf of the vast majority of the American people, Republicans in Congress be forewarned: any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated,” Holder wrote on Twitter. “These are BS attacks on him/his staff that are blatantly political-designed to hide the real wrongdoing. Country not party,” he said. Holder’s tweet comes as some conservatives have tried to discredit Mueller and his ability to lead the probe into Russia’s election meddling and any potential ties…

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Unaccompanied minors and unintended consequences

By Alex Nowrasteh, contributor Government policies have unintended consequences that can play out far into the future. There is perhaps no better example of this than the complex legal changes that have impacted the current surge of unaccompanied immigrant children (UAC) coming across the border. American policies crafted in the 1990s likely unintentionally had a role in incentivizing some of the migration and the smugglers that carry many of the migrants. Two unrelated border policies have hobbled the government’s response to the surge in UAC. The first policy was about how the government should humanely treat apprehended UAC. Children used to…

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Juan Williams: GOP has lost O-Care fight

By Juan Williams – 06/30/14 06:00 AM EDT Republicans bet the house that ObamaCare would be a disaster. They lost. After a four-year feast criticizing ObamaCare, Congressional Republicans are now left picking at the crumbs of minor complaints. Their longstanding predictions of failure have come up empty. The healthcare reform plan is successful. Even if Republicans gain control of the Senate in the midterm elections, the best they can do is stage the first Senate vote to repeal ObamaCare. That will come after 50 or more similar votes by the GOP majority in the House. President Obama will veto any repeal bill, so…

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Poll: Clinton bests Obama on issues

Voters believe former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton would handle a range of foreign and domestic issues better than President Obama is doing so currently, according to a new poll. Clinton, who is widely expected to seek the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016, outpaces the sitting president on every issue surveyed by CNN and ORC. On foreign policy, for example, 63 percent say Clinton would do a good job, while just 40 percent approve of how Obama is now handling international affairs. On terrorism, 61 percent of respondents say Clinton would do a good job, while just 49 percent approve of…

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Chemical weapons turn political and psychological

Pravda

QuestCinq.com Almost a century ago, on April 22, 1915, Germany conducted the first massive chemical attack on the Western Front at Ypres River, in Belgium, releasing chlorine from nearly six thousand bottles. The attack killed about five thousand Frenchmen and Englishmen; the number of those who suffered from chlorine exposure was three times as large. Although chemical weapons had been used in the world before, this date is considered the starting point for the era of combat chemistry. Not that long ago, chemical weapons has evolved from a tool of war to a political reason for starting wars. The above-mentioned…

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Obamacare doesn’t help immigrants: Column

Andrew B. Innerarity for USA TODAY)

QuestCinq.com By Miguel Molina I can’t remember the last time I had a medical check-up; I’m 20, and it’s been at least five years. When I was a little kid in South Los Angeles, my mother would only take my older sister and me to the doctor when we were already sick; whether we had a fever or any other illness, every visit cost $100, including treatments. Then a neighbor informed my mom of a community clinic that offered free visits for low-income families — but only, again, if we were already sick. The clinic was our best option because as…

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“Justice & Réconciliation”, en Haiti!

Serge H. Moise

QuestCinq.com/Opinion Par Serge H. Moïse av. “Les défaites du droit sont toujours provisoires”. L’arrêt de la Cour d’Appel de Port-au-Prince, présidée par l’honorable Jean-Joseph Lebrun confirme, si besoin était, cette maxime juridique trop souvent oubliée ou simplement ignorée des prédateurs, petits ou grands. En effet, le jeudi vingt février en cours, soit deux ans après celle du juge Carvès Jean, concluant contre toute attente que « le crime contre l’humanité n’existait pas en droit haïtien », l’ordonnance de la Cour d’Appel, dans un souci de justice et d’équité a renversé la vapeur et remis la pendule à la bonne heure. L’honorable Juge…

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« Nègre »

Serge H. Moise

QuestCinq.com/Opinion Par Me Serge H. Moise av. « Nègre » Je suis nègre dans mes entrailles Je veux transcender les murailles Qui empêchent encore la lumière D’éclore sur la terre toute entière II Oui je suis nègre dans mes tripes Je ne casserai certes pas ma pipe Avant de redire au monde entier Qu’il est temps de se renouveler III Et la magnificence de la nature Interpellera toutes ses créatures Qu’elles empruntent le chemin Qui feront d’elles des humains IV Ainsi les catastrophes naturelles Dans leurs expressions irréelles Peuvent être des avertissements Pronostiquant ces changements V Tant que cette sagesse africaine Celle…

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Le Miroir!

Serge H. Moise

QuestCinq.com/Opinion Par Serge H. Moïse av. « Le miroir » Comme les dix commandements L’auteur anonyme du document Qui n’est autre qu’un  Haïtien A vidé sa vessie et ses reins II Il en a marre de ses compatriotes Qui se dénigrent et complotent Tels des crabes dans le panier Et passent leur temps à prier III Sans tenir compte de la teneur On demande qui  est l’auteur De ce camouflet sur la toile Qui vogue et à pleine voile IV Aurait-il vraiment raison Voilà la vraie question Qui exigerait le miroir Et non un encensoir V A toute règle ses exceptions Une collective…

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La dernière chance!

Serge H. Moise

QuestCinq.com  Par Serge H. Moïse av. Barreau de Port -au-Prince « La dernière chance » Dans ce singulier petit pays pays où plus ça change plus c’est pareil, il est impossible d’éviter les redites même quand elles deviennent fades et rebutantes. En effet, depuis l’ignoble assassinat de l’Empereur qui a eu la mauvaise fortune d’oser exiger que ceux dont les pères sont en Afrique aient les mêmes droits que les autres, la révolution inachevée bat de l’aile et la perle des antilles symbolise aujourd’hui encore le pays le plus corrompu et le plus pauvre de l’hémisphère. Les analystes de la…

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