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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.”

Joe Rondone, Tallahassee

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration…

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Tensions on immigration erupt in the House GOP

House Republican leaders are scrambling to stop an effort by rank-and-file members to force votes on immigration, with lawmakers openly defying their calls to stand down. Centrist Reps. Carlos Curbelo (Fla.), Jeff Denham (Calif.) and Will Hurd(Texas), all Republicans facing tough reelection races, introduced a discharge petition on Wednesday morning to trigger a series of immigration votes. Discharge petitions are traditionally seen as a serious affront to leadership, making members reluctant to sign on. Yet the effort quickly caught fire, gaining new supporters throughout the day. By press time, at least 17 GOP lawmakers had endorsed the petition, just eight short of the 25 Republican votes that…

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The Memo: Cohen storm grows graver for Trump

The growing storm over Michael Cohen, President Trump’s personal attorney, is casting a dark cloud over the White House. The controversy around Cohen deepened Wednesday when the attorney was reported to have promised access to the Trump administration to one of the corporations that was paying him, drug company Novartis. That allegation, contained in separate reports from NBC News and Stat News and sourced to unnamed people inside Novartis, capped a fraught 24 hours for the White House. The previous evening, lawyer Michael Avenatti, who represents adult-film actress Stormy Daniels, had delivered a bombshell.He asserted that Essential Consultants LLC, a shell…

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Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’

Trump

US President Donald Trump supports the FBI “100%”, he told law enforcement leaders during a graduation ceremony at the agency’s Virginia headquarters. His visit comes only days after he referred to the agency as “in tatters” and “the worst in history”. During his remarks, Mr Trump heaped praise on the FBI, which critics say has grown more politicised since the 2016 election. Earlier he vowed to “rebuild the FBI… bigger and better than ever”. “The president of the United States has your back 100 percent,” he said on Friday at the FBI’s National Academy in Quantico, Virginia. “By the way,…

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GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote

Greg Nash

The final Republican tax bill will increase the amount of the refundable child tax credit to $1,400, Rep. Kristi Noem (R-S.D.) told reporters Friday, as leaders seek to win the vote of Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.). The refundable amount was $1,100 in the Senate-passed tax bill, but Rubio on Thursday said that wasn’t good enough. He has threatened to vote against the bill unless the refundable amount of the credit is increased. It’s unclear whether the change will be enough to satisfy him. A spokeswoman for Rubio said they had not yet seen the text of the bill, but warned that unless the percentage of the refundable credit is significantly…

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Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’

Photo Tasos Katopodis, Getty Images

Donald Trump Jr. leaves the Senate Intelligence Committee on Dec. 13, 2017 in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Tasos Katopodis, Getty Images) Twitter users pounced on Donald Trump Jr. Thursday for a tweet about the debate over net neutrality that featured a prominent typo and an apparent misconception about which president appointed the current chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. “I would pay good money to see all those people complaining about Obama’s FCC chairman voting to repeal #NetNeutality (sic) actually explain it in detail,” the president’s eldest son tweeted. “I’d bet most hadn’t heard of it before this week.” Donald Trump Jr. ✔@DonaldJTrumpJr…

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Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups

BBC

Roy Moore says he will not accept defeat in Alabama’s election, arguing the vote was “tainted” by outside groups trying to stay in power. In a four-minute video on YouTube, the hardline Republican lashed out after Democrat Doug Jones claimed victory in Tuesday’s election. Mr Moore railed against gay rights, abortion, and “the right of a man to claim to be a woman and vice versa”. Democrats will hold the Alabama senate seat for the first time in 25 years. “We are indeed in a struggle to preserve our republic, our civilisation and our religion,” Mr Moore said in fire-and-brimstone…

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Russian Foreign Ministry: Donald Trump has very hard time

Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova commented on the US cruise missile strike on the Syrian airbase in Homs. According to her, these actions have an absolutely obvious political background. “We have repeatedly stated and emphasised at all levels that, unfortunately, the US domestic political situation and internal political layouts in Washington show increasing influence on the state of affairs in the world,” Zakharova said. Donald Trump is having hard times indeed during his first months as president, because “various political institutions in the US show as much opposition as possible to the work of the new US administration,” Zakharova…

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DHS suspends ‘any and all actions’ on Trump travel ban

Getty Images

The Department of Homeland Security says it has suspended “any and all actions” regarding President Trump’s ban on citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries entering the United States, though it plans to file an emergency stay on the ruling halting it. “At the earliest possible time, the Department of Justice intends to file an emergency stay of this order and defend the President’s Executive Order, which is lawful and appropriate,” spokesperson Gillian Christensen said in a statement, as first reported by BuzzFeed News. Homeland Security said in its statement that it was suspending “any and all actions implementing the affected sections”…

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U.N. accepts role in deadly Haiti cholera outbreak for first time

Nicoderm Aristide, left, waits with his daughter Sofia (not shown) as Katiana Presmy holds her daughter Erica Jupiter, 4, at cholera treatment facility in Port-Au-Prince in late 2010. (Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post) By Nick Miroff August 18 at 9:33 AM U.N. officials have acknowledged for the first time that the organization bears responsibility for the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti that has sickened hundreds of thousands and left some 10,000 dead. U.N. officials have refused for years to acknowledge a role in bringing cholera to Haiti, but suspicions have long fallen on a contingent of U.N. peacekeeping troops from Nepal…

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