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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

Colombia acts on massacres – punishing whistleblower and promoting officers

Reuters, The Guardian

Sergeant Carlos Mora started to suspect there was something fishy about his brigade’s combat kills when he was posted to an intelligence unit in the region of Norte de Santander in north-east Colombia in 2006. After a sudden spike in the number of “positive” results, he noticed that the corpses of supposed leftwing guerrillas killed in skirmishes with troops seemed oddly placed, and that weapons found next to the bodies often matched those previously confiscated from common criminals. Mora reported his suspicions to his superior officers, but was met with insults and harassment, and found himself sent on increasingly dangerous assignments. When…

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Former ambassador’s bizarre attack on Obama lays bare strains in US-Israeli ties

Photograph Nicholas Kamm,AFP,Getty Images

It’s a peculiar feature of American relations with Israel that more than a few senior diplomats posted from Jerusalem to Washington were once US citizens. The present Israeli ambassador, Ron Dermer, was born in Miami Beach and carried an American passport until he renounced it in 2005 in order to serve as the Jewish state’s economic envoy in DC. When Dermer lived in the US, before moving to Israel two decades ago, he was a Republican party operative. There is a view in the White House that he remains one as ambassador after Dermer colluded with Republican leaders to embarrass Barack Obama, most…

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Euro zone sets emergency summit on Greece as money flees

(Reuters)…Euro zone leaders will hold an emergency summit on Monday to try to avert a Greek default after bank withdrawals accelerated and government revenue slumped as Athens and its international creditors remain deadlocked over a debt deal. Finance ministers of the 19-nation currency bloc failed to make any breakthrough on a cash-for-reforms agreement at talks in Luxembourg on Thursday, just 12 days beforeGreece must make a crucial debt repayment to the International Monetary Fund. “Regrettably … too little progress has been made. No agreement is in sight,” Jeroen Dijsselbloem, chairman of the Eurogroup, told a news conference. Ministers sent a strong signal that…

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Senate Dems give GOP 45-day highway deadline

The Hill

Senate Democrats are giving Republicans 45 days to negotiate a long-term highway funding extension. And while they aren’t ruling out supporting another short-term fix when funding runs out at the end of July, they suggest it will be difficult to get such a measure through the Senate. “The bottom line is, we’re asking them to meet our timetable. If they don’t meet this timetable, it will be very hard for us to do another short-term extension,” Sen. Charles Schumer (N.Y.), the third-ranking member of the Democratic leadership, told reporters Tuesday. “We do not want a 34th short-term extension of this…

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Boehner rips Republicans for ‘nonsense’

Greg Nash

(The Hill)…Displaying a rare flash of anger, Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) on Tuesday chastised the nearly three dozen Republicans who voted against a procedural rule that structured how a critical trade package was brought to the House floor. “I made it pretty clear to the members today I was not very happy about it,” Boehner told reporters after a closed-door meeting with rank-and-file members at the Capitol Hill Club. “You know, we’re a team. And we’ve worked hard to get the majority; we’ve worked hard to stay in the majority. “And I expect our team to act like a team,…

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Top Dem: ‘No smoking gun’ in latest Benghazi documents

Anne Wernikoff

The top Democrat on the House committee investigating the Benghazi attack says there is “no smoking gun” among the roughly 60 newly disclosed emails between Hillary Clinton and adviser Sidney Blumenthal. “I can say that there is no smoking gun,” Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), the ranking member on the House Select Committee on Benghazi, told reporters before heading into Blumenthal’s closed-door deposition. “I don’t recall anything on the Benghazi attack itself,” he added. Cummings said the messages cover a “wide range of things,” but declined to offer specifics. He called on chairman Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) to release the emails on…

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Russia says will retaliate if U.S. weapons stationed on its borders

A plan by Washington to station tanks and heavy weapons in NATO states on Russia’s border would be the most aggressive U.S. act since the Cold War, and Moscow would retaliate by beefing up its own forces, a Russian defense official said on Monday. The United States is offering to store military equipment on allies’ territory in eastern Europe, a proposal aimed at reassuring governments worried that after the conflict inUkraine, they could be the Kremlin’s next target. Poland and the Baltic states, where officials say privately they have been frustrated the NATO alliance has not taken more decisive steps…

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Obama: I respond to people who call me ‘idiot’

The Hill

During an interview with entertainment news program “Extra,” correspondent Jerry Penacoli thanked the president for his healthcare law, which he says “pretty much saved my finances and my life” during his battle with cancer. “The number of stories I have gotten like yours — it’s made a difference in a lot of people’s lives,” Obama said in the interview, which aired Thursday. But not all the feedback the president gets from the public is positive. “I get 10 letters a night out of the 40,000 letters and emails and messages that we get,” he said. “Some of them are just saying thank…

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L’Afrique donne le coup d’envoi à un marché commun « du Cap au Caire »

Wikipedia

Cecil Rhodes en rêvait : construire un continuum économique et politique en Afrique « du Cap au Caire ». Un siècle et quelques années plus tard, à Charm el-Cheikh, vingt-six dirigeants de pays d’Afrique ont, mercredi 10 juin, posé les bases d’un vaste marché unique courant de l’Afrique du Sud au Caire. Ce n’est plus, là, le mythe impérial d’un colonialiste anglais qui voulait relier, à la fin du dix-neuvième siècle, toutes les colonies de son pays, mais un projet porté par les Africains eux-mêmes, auxquels il reste nombre d’obstacles à surmonter avant d’accomplir ce rêve. Sur le papier, ce projet, né après cinq ans de négociations,…

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UK police killing of Brazilian heard in Euro court

The death of a 27-year-old Brazilian shot by police in the wake of the 2005 London bombings could have been prevented, a lawyer for the United Kingdom told Europe’s top human rights court on Wednesday, adding the incident did not however amount to murder. The European Court of Human Rights was opening hearings into Britain’s handling of the case nearly ten years after police shot Jean Charles de Menezes seven times in the head as he boarded an underground train in south London. They mistook him for one of four men who unsuccessfully tried to bomb London’s transport system the…

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