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Friday, July 20, 2018

A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

British spies were first to spot Trump team’s links with Russia -

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Pennsylvania poll: Clinton up by 9 points

Getty Images

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton leads Republican nominee Donald Trump by 9 points in Pennsylvania, according to a new Suffolk University poll. In a head-to-head matchup, Clinton has 50 percent support and Trump has 41 percent support among likely general-election voters in the battleground state. Another 8 percent are undecided. In a four-way matchup, including Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein, Clinton still holds a 9-point lead over Trump, 46 to 37 percent. Johnson takes 5 percent and Stein takes 3 percent. Another 9 percent are undecided. In the four-way matchup, Clinton led by 19 points…

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Poll: Trump even with Clinton in three swing states

USA TODAY

A new poll has good news for Donald Trump in the swing states of Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania. Trump is either slightly ahead or tied with Democratic rival Hillary Clinton in those three key battlegrounds, according to a Quinnipiac University Swing State Poll released Wednesday. “He has wiped out Hillary Clinton’s lead in Florida; is on the upside of too-close to call races in Florida and Pennsylvania and is locked in a dead heat in Ohio,” said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll. The numbers, according to Quinnipiac: One possible reason for Clinton’s drop: her use of private email…

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Poll: Trump holds 34-point lead in California

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Donald Trump leads his GOP presidential rivals by 34 points in California ahead of the state’s primary on June 7, according to a poll released Monday. Trump is at 54 percent support, followed by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz at 20 percent and Ohio Gov. John Kasich at 16 percent, according to the SurveyUSA poll published by ABC7. All three candidates spoke at the state GOP convention over the weekend, and California is the final major state with delegates needed to secure the GOP nomination up for grabs. Trump and Cruz are campaigning in Indiana on the eve of that state’s primary. Trump’s…

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Trump leads Clinton by two points in Rasmussen poll

Donald Trump leads Hillary Clinton by 2 points in a head-to-head matchup, according to a newRasmussen Reports telephone survey. Trump gets 41 percent to Clinton’s 39 percent in the new poll. This poll differs from recent polling, which all show Clinton holding a lead over the Republican front-runner.According to the RealClearPolitics average of polls, Clinton has a 7.3 point lead over Trump, 47.4 to 40.1 percent. Just last week, Clinton and Trump tied in another Rasmussen poll in which each won 38 percent. In that survey, voters were also allowed to answer that they would stay home and not vote for either candidate. According to the latest…

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Poll: Sanders leads Clinton by 20 in NH

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders leads rival Hillary Clinton by 20 points in New Hampshire, according to a new NBC News/Wall Street/Marist poll released Thursday. In the poll — conducted entirely after the Iowa caucuses that Clinton won by a razor-thin margin — Sanders receives 58 percent support from likely Democratic primary voters. Clinton gets 38 percent support. The same poll conducted last week showed similar numbers, with Sanders receiving 57 percent and Clinton 38 percent. The Vermont senator has huge leads with young people and independents, the poll found. Among independents, he garners 69 percent to Clinton’s 26 percent. And with…

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The world ‘largely likes’ the US, says global survey

The White House

A global survey of 40 countries by the Pew Research Center finds that large numbers of people have a favourable opinion of the United States, its economy and the US-led fight against the Islamic State. Overall, the US is largely seen in a positive light, with a global median of 69% of people saying they viewed the US favourably. That’s up from 65% in 2013 and 2014, says Pew. But when it comes to the issue of post-9/11 interrogation techniques – which many consider to be torture – the US has received a worldwide rebuke.   US v China   Chinese and…

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British PM David Cameron confounds polls to win second term

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron leaves Number 10 Downing Street to attend a Victory in Europe (VE) day ceremony in central London

(BBC)…British prime minister David Cameron has confounded pollsters and pundits by winning a sensational second five-year term in office for his Conservative party. This time Cameron will be free from the constraints of coalition with the centrist Liberal Democrats. The Lib Dems, Cameron’s partners in office since 2010, were almost wiped out, and their leader, deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, resigned on Friday morning. Cameron’s victory in Thursday’s general election obliterated opposition leader Ed Miliband’s hopes of eking out a small win for Labour. Miliband also resigned in the wake of the defeat. But it came at the price for the Tories of stunning success…

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Half of public would blame GOP for shutdown

By Rebecca Shabad – 12/01/14 11:08 AM EST Half of the public would blame GOP lawmakers for a government shutdown while only a third would blame President Obama, according to a CNN survey released Monday. Thirteen percent, meanwhile, said Republicans and the president would both be responsible while 2 percent said neither should be blamed or said they had no opinion. A plurality of people polled said a government shutdown that would last a few days would be a major problem. Just under a quarter said it would be a minor problem and 20 percent said it would be a crisis. The government shutdown in…

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Brazil poll shows Neves leading election, at odds with major surveys

Brazil's presidential candidates Neves of Brazilian Social Democratic Party attends a news conference in Rio de Janeiro

(Reuters) – Opposition candidate Aecio Neves has a shrinking lead over President Dilma Rousseff in Brazil’s presidential race, an outlying poll showed on Friday, at odds with major pollsters that report a growing lead for the incumbent. The new poll conducted by Sensus showed Neves with 54.6 percent of valid voter support and 45.4 percent for Rousseff. Sensus had shown an advantage of nearly 13 percentage points for Neves last week and almost 18 percentage points the week before. Two more closely watched polls on Thursday showed Rousseff with a lead of 6 to 8 percentage points. A mild economic…

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Brazil’s Rousseff pulls ahead of Neves as election nears

Brazil's President and Workers' Party (PT) presidential candidate Rousseff takes part in a TV debate in Sao Paulo

(Reuters) – Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff pulled ahead of opposition candidate Aecio Neves in another poll on Wednesday and looks like a slight favorite heading into what is expected to be the country’s tightest election in decades. The Datafolha poll was the fourth in three days to show Rousseff approaching Sunday’s runoff vote with a slight edge over Neves, who had stirred investor enthusiasm by promising business-friendly policies to revive a sluggish economy. Brazil’s stocks and currency have sold off this week as Neves lost momentum in a race that he was recently leading. The benchmark Bovespa stock index hovered…

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