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A government lawyer acknowledged Monday that the Trump administration will miss its first court-imposed deadline to reunite about 100 immigrant children under age 5 with their parents. Department of Justice attorney Sarah Fabian said during a court hearing that federal authorities reunited two families and expect to reunite an additional 59 by Tuesday’s deadline. She said the other cases are more complicated, including parents who have been deported or are in prison facing criminal charges, and would require more time to complete reunions. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, who ordered the administration to reunite families separated as part of President Donald Trump’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy, said he will hold another hearing Tuesday morning to get an update on the remaining cases. He said he was encouraged to see “real progress” in the complicated reunification process after a busy weekend when officials from multiple federal agencies tried to sync up parents and children who are spread across the country. STORY FROM LENDINGTREE Crush your mortgage interest with a 15 yr fixed “Tomorrow is the deadline. I do recognize that there are some groups of parents who are going to fall into a category where it’s impossible to reunite by tomorrow,” he said. “I am very encouraged by the progress. I’m optimistic.” Lee Gelernt, an American Civil Liberties Union attorney who leads a lawsuit against the federal government, sounded more skeptical. When asked by the judge if he believed the government was in full compliance of the court order, Gelernt said there was much more work to be done. “Let me put it this way: I think the government in the last 48 hours has taken significant steps,” he said. “We just don’t know how much effort the government has made to find released parents. I don’t think there’s been full compliance.” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw, based in San Diego. (Photo: U.S. District Court) The difficulty in reuniting the first 100 children shows the challenge that lies ahead as the Trump administration braces for another deadline in two weeks to reunite nearly 3,000 older children – up to age 17 – with their parents. The process is complicated because of all the different situations that emerged over the weekend. The government initially identified 102 children under age 5 who needed to be reunited but removed three children from that list because investigations into their cases revealed that those children came with adults who were not their parents, Fabian said. Twelve parents were found to be in federal and state custody on criminal charges, making a reunification impossible since the government can’t transfer minors to state and local prisons to protect the well-being of the child. Nine parents were deported, and the government established contact with only four of them, Fabian said. Four children had been scheduled to be released from government custody to relatives who weren’t their parents, leading the government to question whether to allow that process to be completed or to redirect the child back to a parent. Gelernt said he understood many of the hurdles but urged the judge to force the government to scrap its time-consuming investigation into every single case and start a 48-hour clock to reunify families that remain separated by Tuesday. Sabraw said he would decide that during Tuesday’s hearing. Fabian said one of the silver linings of the busy weekend is that her office worked closely with its challengers at the ACLU to share information on each child’s case, to ensure that representatives from immigration advocacy groups and volunteer organizations could be present during each reunification. Gelernt said they’re doing that to help the parents, who are often released from custody with no money and nowhere to go. Fabian said that coordination has led to a more formalized process between government agencies and with the immigrants’ lawyers that should make reunifications go more smoothly in the coming weeks. “I think this process over the weekend helped us see what information, and in what form, is the most useful to share,” she said. “I’d like to make that as efficient a process as possible.” -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Trump denies US opposition to WHO breastfeeding resolution -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Mwen se moun nan Panyòl -

Monday, July 9, 2018

ZILE PAM NAN -

Monday, July 9, 2018

Havana plane crash leaves more than 100 dead -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Shia cleric Moqtada Sadr bloc wins Iraq elections -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott: ‘We need to do more than just pray for the victims and their families’ -

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Donald Trump says he will meet North Korea’s Kim Jong Un on June 12 in Singapore -

Thursday, May 10, 2018

Trump tells FBI: ‘I have your back 100%’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Mueller requests emails from Trump campaign data firm: report -

Friday, December 15, 2017

GOP changes child tax credit in bid to win Rubio’s vote -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Trump Jr. is berated for tweet about ‘Obama’s FCC’ chair, net ‘neutality’ -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to marry on 19 May 2018 -

Friday, December 15, 2017

Walt Disney buys Murdoch’s Fox for $52.4bn -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Roy Moore says Alabama election ‘tainted’ by outside groups -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Eric Holder warns GOP: ‘Any attempt to remove Bob Mueller will not be tolerated’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Former British prime minister: Trump attacks on press are ‘dangerous’ -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

China says war must not be allowed on Korean peninsula -

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Megyn Kelly left Fox News in part due to O’Reilly: report -

Saturday, April 15, 2017

North Korea warns against U.S. ‘hysteria’ as it marks founder’s birth -

Friday, April 14, 2017

New poll shows Clinton maintains lead over Trump nationally

USATODAY

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump (Photo: Getty Images) Hillary Clinton now leads Donald Trump by 8 percentage points among likely voters and 7 points among registered voters, according to a new Monmouth University Poll. The poll finds the presumptive Democratic nominee leads Trump 49% to 41% among likely voters and 47% to 40% among registered voters. The Monmouth poll also indicates that neither the Democratic candidate nor the presumptive GOP nominee are very popular — Clinton has a 52% unfavorable rating in the poll, while Trump has a 57% unfavorable rating. “Clinton has the advantage as the general election campaign kicks off, particularly in key…

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Russia vs Wales,Slovakia vs England…

soccer-ball

3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales (DE) 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales (FR) 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales (SE) 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Russia vs Wales (Welsh) 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Slovakia vs England 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Slovakia vs England 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Slovakia vs England 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Slovakia vs England (DE) 21:00 CET 3:00 PM ET Slovakia vs England (Eesti)…

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US election: Clinton set to tighten nomination grip

NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 07:  Former United States Secretary of State Hillary Clinton attends the event "Equality for Women is Progress for All" at the United Nations on March 7, 2014 in New York City. The event was part of the United Nations International Women's Day, which is celebrated tomorrow, March 8.  (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 477466241 ORIG FILE ID: 477131601

Six states vote on Tuesday, with California (543 delegates) and New Jersey (142) the big prizes. Associated Press said Mrs Clinton had already reached the 2,383 delegates needed, taking into account pledges of support from so-called superdelegates. Rival Bernie Sanders insists it is too early to call the result. Donald Trump has already secured the Republican nomination. ‘Unprecedented moment’ Voting also takes place on Tuesday in Democratic primaries in Montana (27 delegates), New Mexico (43) and South Dakota (25), with a caucus in North Dakota (23). The final primary is in Washington DC on 14 June. It has 45 delegates….

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Russia: Temporary ceasefire takes effect in Damascus suburb

The Russian Defence Ministry said on Wednesday that a temporary ceasefire, which it called a “regime of calm”, had taken effect from June 1 for 48 hours in the Damascus suburb of Daraya to allow for the distribution of humanitarian aid to civilians. Syria’s government has been refusing U.N. efforts to send aid into Daraya and several other areas besieged by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad, despite what the United Nations calls a “horrendously critical” food situation. Daraya, close to a large air base and only a few kilometers (miles) from Assad’s palace, has been besieged and regularly bombed…

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Trump’s ‘playbooks’ offer glimpse of ruthless business practices

Fox News

A federal judge has given the world an unprecedented glimpse into the ruthless business practices Donald Trump used to build his business empire. US district court judge Gonzalo Curiel on Tuesday made public more than 400 pages of Trump University “playbooks” describing how Trump staff should target prospective students’ weaknesses to encourage them to sign up for a $34,995 Gold Elite three-day package. Trump University staff were instructed to get people to pile on credit card debt and to target their financial weaknesses in an attempt to sell them the high-priced real estate courses. The documents contained an undated “personal…

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UN response to Haiti cholera epidemic critics signals ‘potential breakthrough’

The Guardian

Figaro Nau rests on a stretcher in the Cholera Treatment Center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. At least 30,000 people have died from the outbreak, latest studies show. Photograph: Andres Martinez Casares/Reuters The United Nations is showing the first signs of compromise over the Haiti cholera epidemic, after more than five years in which it has consistently refused to accept responsibility for a disaster that has claimed tens of thousands of lives. Groups working with Haitian victims have greeted the apparent shift in the UN’s position as a potential breakthrough in a crisis that has devastated one of the poorest countries in…

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London keeps world on a short leash

Pravda

The British PM David Cameron called Nigeria and Afghanistan to be “fantastically corrupt countries”. Representatives of Nigeria and Afghanistan held it offensive. They believe they have done a lot to put an end to corruption in their countries. President of Nigeria said he wouldn’t demand apologies and claimed that London would rather help to return what had been stolen by local officials. Yuriy Solozobov, Director of international projects at the National Strategy Institute of Russia, commented Pravda.Ru on the issue. “Money, which was moved out of the country, goes to the Western financial centres. The main financial centre is situated…

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Susannah Mushatt Jones, last US woman born in 19th Century, dies

BBC

The oldest known person in the world has died in New York aged 116. Born on an Alabama farm in July 1899, Susannah Mushatt Jones was also the last living American born in the 19th Century. She lived in three centuries, through two world wars and 20 US presidencies. An Italian woman, Emma Morano, now takes on the title of oldest person in the world, and is thought to be the last living person to have been born in the 1890s. Ms Jones was one of 11 children. Her grandparents were slaves, her parents crop pickers. She attended a special…

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India’s top court slams authorities over “ostrich-like” attitude to drought

Cracked soil at Manjara Dam is seen in Osmanabad,  April 17, 2016. REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui

NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – India’s top court on Wednesday slammed authorities for delays in responding to the worst drought in decades, saying that some states had taken an “ostrich-like attitude” towards the calamity, and called on the government to set up a drought fund. More than 330 million people – almost a quarter of India’s population – have been hit by water shortages across 13 of the country’s 29 states, including Haryana, Bihar, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Odisha, Uttar Pradesh, and Karnataka. A petition filed by Swaraj Abhiyan, a Delhi-based non-profit group, said that India’s current method of declaring drought…

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Hagel says NATO deployment could spark a new Cold War with Russia

Getty Images

By Kristina Wong – 05/11/16 02:29 AM EDT Former Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Tuesday urged caution in response to NATO’s plans to deploy four battalions to the Baltic states, warning it could lead to another Cold War with Russia. “If I were secretary of defense today, I’d be careful with this because, I’m not opposed to it, but we can find ourselves very quickly in another Cold War buildup here, that really makes no sense for either side,” he said at a media roundtable at the Atlantic Council. In response to NATO’s decision to send the four battalions —…

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